July PAC: SWAT!

Please join us for the MPD Second Precinct PAC.  July 13 at 6 PM  Monroe Village Community Room, 1900 Central Avenue NE

In May we had a look at one of the special SWAT team vehicles which was at the 2nd Precinct Open House.  Last month we met Nash, the K-9 assigned to the SWAT team.  This month we’ll learn  about the rest of the team.

The Special Weapons And Tactics team  is the team of MPD assigned to handle high risk situations.  These are the people who work with the Dept. of Homeland Security, and who are expected to be on the front line of extreme situations, whatever may occur.

Our presenter is  Sgt. John Sheneman, who is is also a supervisor at the Second Precinct.  He plans on making a 15 minute presentation and will then show some of the equipment the SWAT team members use

If there is something  you’ve been wondering about, you can ask St. Sheneman directly or send me your questions and I’ll see he gets them.

You can read more about the team at  the city website:

http://www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/police/recruiting/org/police_recruiting_units

Following Sgt. Sheneman’s presentation, we will have our monthly report on trends and events in the Precinct, followed by Courtwatch.

Inspector Waite in the S’Trib!

She’s a woman of many talents!

http://www.startribune.com/minneapolis-police-build-little-free-libraries/305100961/

Nice picture, too.

June 8 speaker: Sgt. Stender from the k-9 Unit and Nash

Join us at 6 PM on June 8 at 1900 Central Ave NE, Monroe Village Community Room

Our speaker this month will be Sgt.  Andy Stender of  the MPD K-9 unit and he’s bringing his  partner, Nash.

The Minneapolis K-9 Unit has been operating since 1966.  There are currently 16 officer/K-9 teams.

The dogs are purchased by the Minneapolis Police K-9 Foundation from an independent   vending agency.  Candidates  must be social dogs who are at ease with people, and  they must be dogs who enjoy playing but can focus on command.  Police K-9s are “nose” dogs, not hunters.  The dogs currently  in the unit are chiefly German Shepherds, but also include a Malinois, Malinois/Shepherd crosses, and a single Dutch Shepherd.

The dogs are initially trained for detection and apprehension. They then  receive further training in explosive or narcotics detection, and other specialties.  Sgt. Stender’s partner, Nash, is part of the SWAT team.   Above all, the dog’s primary work goal is to make the work safer for the humans he works with.

The teams are truly teams:  the dogs work the same shift  with their humans, go home to the family after the shift is over to relax  and enjoy home life.  Dogs retire at about 10 years old to spend their retirement years with their human family.

FFI see the Minneapolis Police Canine Foundation homepage:

http://www.mplspolicek9foundation.org/

Very Important Correction

The deadline request for impact statements is APRIL 27.

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Call for Community Impact Statements: Prospect Park East River Road

On January 17, Jesse Alan Houge committed a 2nd Degree Aggravated Robbery (implying that he had a gun)  at Barton and Melbourne at about 8PM.  He then moved to Arthur Avenue at Sidney Place, and committed a 1st Degree Aggravated Robbery, this time displaying his gun.  He was caught and charged, and entered a guilty plea, which means no jury trial.  The judge in this case will have the sole determination of the outcome.  The Hennepin County Attorney’s office has requested impact statements from neighbors in the community.

How does this person’s crime, in your immediate neighborhood, early in the evening, make you feel about your safety close to home?  If you have been affected by this person’s action, please write a comment to be forwarded to the judge.

Your comments should include the following information:

State v. Jesse Alan Houge

Case # 27-CR-15-1797

Case # 27-CR-15-1800

Your name, phone number with area code, employer (if applicable), your title, the date.

You do not  need  to write a long, polished essay. A few honest sentences about how this person’s act made you feel or think differently, and  what you want as an outcome for the case are all that are needed.
Mr. Houge’s court date is May 1.  Impact statements should be turned in by APRIL 27 so there’s plenty of time to get them to the judge.  You may hand deliver or mail to Nick Juarez, MPD Second  Precinct, 1911 Central Ave NE, Minneapolis, MN 55418.  Email delivery is fine:  nicholas.juarez@minneapolismn.gov
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I am very sorry about that mistake.  Please get those statements in and ask your friends to do the same.

Community Impact Statements needed

COURTWATCH:

Call for Community Impact Statements two aggravated robberies in a residential n’hood

On January 17, Jesse Alan Houge committed a 2nd Degree Aggravated Robbery (implying that he had a gun) at Barton and Melbourne SE at about 8PM. He then moved to Arthur Avenue at Sidney Place, and committed a 1st Degree Aggravated Robbery, this time displaying his gun. He was caught and charged, and entered a guilty plea, which means no jury trial. The judge in this case will have the sole determination of the outcome. The Hennepin County Attorney’s office has requested impact statements from neighbors in the community.

How does this person’s crime, on the Eastside of Minneapolis, early in the evening, make you feel about your safety close to home? Please be very aware that Mr. Houge committed two Aggravated Robberies in a residential neighborhood, less than a block from a public school. He did this between 8 and 8:30 PM, prime time for dog walkers, kids returning home from a playdate at a neighbor’s house, neighbors outside for many reasons. If you have been affected by this person’s action, please write a comment to be forwarded to the judge.

Your comments should include the following information:

State v. Jesse Alan Houge

Case # 27-CR-15-1797

Case # 27-CR-15-1800

Your name, phone number with area code, employer (if applicable), your title, the date.

You do not need to write a long, polished essay. A few honest sentences about how this person’s act made you feel or think differently, and what you want as an outcome for the case are all that are needed.

Mr. Houge’s court date is May 1. Impact statements should be turned in by May 27 so there’s plenty of time to get them to the judge. Please hand deliver or mail to Nick Juarez, MPD Second Precinct, 1911 Central Ave NE, Minneapolis, MN 55418. Email delivery is fine: nicholas.juarez@minneapolismn.gov

2PAC 13 Apr 2015 Meeting

Start: 6:15 pm
23 in attendance
Minutes of March meeting: approved

MINNEAPOLIS PARK AND RECREATION: PROGRAMS AND SAFETY
Our guest speakers were Larry Umphrey, Director of Recreation Centers and Programs, and Lt. Calvin Noble, Minneapolis Parks Police.

SUMMER IN THE PARKS: Larry Umphrey:
Thanks to financial support from Major League Baseball, Eastside parks will be enjoying the ever popular Fundamentals of Baseball program and the fields will be getting some much needed improvements.

There are many programs available during the summer that include Day Camp “Camp Northeast”. These are “closed campus” programs so kids who are enrolled are being kept on site, not wandering off. All youth programs, including day care and camps are linked to this page:

https://www.minneapolisparks.org/activities__events/youth_programs/

Summer programs include a meal which is paid for by the USDA and the MPS Summer Lunch Program.

https://www.minneapolisparks.org/activities__events/youth_programs/teen_programs/summer_meals/

The Night Owls Program is for 12-18 year-olds on Friday nights, again providing good programs in a safe place.

The Master Planning Meetings are going on now, mostly focused on spring basketball, softball, track and field. Fields are being revamped to meet changing needs of changing programs. Eliott Park now has an artificial turf soccer field which is partly an answer to the need created by the heavy use the parks get. Fields are used for skating in the winter, followed by three seasons of hard use as playing fields. There really isn’t any time for soil or turf to recover.

One very important and very “green” new item is coming this summer: Weber is opening a new concept in public aquatics: a pool and beach development at Weber will be the first non-chemical natural filter for clean water. Look for announcements in July.
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POLICING THE PARKS: Lt. Calvin Noble

Lt. Calvin Noble, who leads the Park Police Department’s patrol division spoke about changes in that office.

Established in 1887, the MPRB Police is a separate department from the MPD. Officers are fully trained by MPD, and have all the responsibilities of any MPD officer. The Park Police have 35 sworn officers on staff but changes in the pension plan moved many people to take retirement. The force is now returning to full strength, by the end of this year 14 of the 25 patrol officers will be new to the department within the past two years.

Officers are assisted by members of the Park Patrol: 10 people are currently in training for that. Those new agents will bring the department back to the full strength of 22 Park Patrol Agents. The Park Agents wear grey while the Park Officers wear MPD uniforms. Park Patrol Agents are authorized to take reports, write tickets, etc., freeing regular Officers to work in the parks and handle more serious crimes. When the MPRB Police is fully staffed it has 57 individuals including both Park Police Officers and Park Patrol Agents. Park Police are off duty at 1AM and back on at 7AM. Between those times, park security is the responsibility of the MPD.

As recently as the 1970s, the MPRB Police used to have a lot of part time police officers; many summer staff were actually school teachers who needed extra jobs. That program eventually became what is now the Park Patrol Agent program. Under the current program, Park Agent training is standard and professional. One downside is that they lose many employees each year to jobs in other places. Many of the Park Agents are either in school to become an officer or have completed their schooling and are seeking sworn positions with a police department. Being a Park Patrol Agent is a valuable line on a resume; the training is that good and other cities want staff with Minneapolis training!

The Park Police are responsible for some 200 pieces of land in several cities, including St. Louis Park, St. Anthony and other cities. Parks are 15% of the land in Minneapolis but the site of only 3% of the crime.

The Minneapolis Park Police works collaboratively with the Hennepin County Sheriff’s department as well as other local law enforcement agencies where the MPRB has property.

There are a lot of requests for dog parks in Minneapolis, but that is a NIMBY issue. Because of dog owners’ perceived need for dog parks, the Park Police get a lot of complaints about unleashed dogs in the people parks. It is one of the biggest complaints that the department receives.

Much of the crime in the parks is down though there has been a rise in robberies in some parts of Minneapolis. Most of the robberies involve the suspect taking the victim’s phone. Note that theft from a locked car is considered a property crime, not a crime against person. Criminals watch to see what runners tuck something under the driver’s seat or in the trunk, wait until the owner is out of sight and then break in; it only takes moments.

Two circumstances drive many Thefts from Motor Vehicles: a stolen credit card retrieved from under a car seat can be easily be used, often before it’s reported stolen. Target, among other places, does not require an ID to use a credit card, so a stolen card can be used to purchase gift cards. Similarly cellphones are often easy to take because most people carry one and people often have them out either talking on them, looking down at them, or allow suspects to use/see the phones. When people are looking at their phones, they’re not alert to their surroundings. Until recently the phones could be flipped for cash in kiosks with nothing to even slow down the process. Recent laws have changed that though there are other means of selling a stolen phone for cash or trading for other items.

INSPECTOR WAITE’S REPORT ON EASTSIDE CRIME:

Burglaries are on the rise, especially in large apartment buildings, which can have a “dormitory” atmosphere. People know people on their floors, and figure the street doors are locked so leave their apartment doors unlocked. Additionally, as homeowners get into their yards, they leave their doors unlocked also. At this time of year, lots of bikes and lawnmowers disappear from unlocked garages.

The best advice is to mark your property so that you can identify it. Too often the police will find a bike that has been abandoned someplace that is close to a description of a disappeared bike but since there is no serial number or hidden ID, there is nothing the police can do to match the bike with the description. Serial numbers are always best.

Robberies are increasing especially west of Central and north of Broadway.

Inspector Waite asks that people please call about juveniles out past curfew. These young people are very vulnerable in many respects, not only being victims of crime, but also beginning to move into a poor life style.

Curfew Deadlines:
SUNDAY- THURSDAY FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Under 12 Home by 9PM Home by 10PM

12-14 Home by 10PM Home by 11PM

15-17 Home by 11PM Home by Midnight

April PAC: In our Parks: Safety and programming in our award-winning public parks

Join us for our monthly 2nd Precinct Advisory Council meeting at 6 PM, on April 13 at Monroe Village Apartments, 1900 Central Avenue NE. There is plenty of on-street parking very close to the corner.

ONE CHANGE: Please enter the Monroe Village Community Room from the courtyard entrance, not the front door. Walk a quarter block down 19th and you’ll see a well-lit drive and sidewalk. The first door on your right is the security entrance to our meeting place. Signs will be up.

Our Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board has been named the Number 1 U.S. Park System, not once, but twice, in 2013 and 2014. It’s time to be planning your family’s spring sports and summer activities so you don’t miss a single day of safe, professionally planned activities. Join us at PAC to find out more about what they are and how they happen.

Our April speakers are Larry Umphrey, Director of Recreation Centers and Programs, who makes sure our programs are planned to include activities for people of all ages.

With Mr. Umphrey is Lt. Calvin Noble, who leads the patrol division of the Park Police. He will give a brief overview of his department which includes both sworn officers and non-sworn Park Patrol Agents. He will tell us how he and his staff operate, both independently and in cooperation with our own Second Precinct, to keep Eastside parks safe places to go and send our children. Inspector Waite joins him to explain how the two police departments coordinate and back each other up.

There will be plenty of time for questions following their talks. That’s also a good time to mention something you’ve seen in other cities that might be good to have in Minneapolis. Who knows? Perhaps it’s already here!

COURT WATCH

Court Watch will start approximately at 6:45 pm. Court Watch is a collaborative, community-based approach to criminal justice. Concerned citizens are partners with police, prosecutors, probation officers and others to respond to public safety issues.

This event is more than “Open to the Public”. PAC meetings are your opportunity to learn a little each month about the safety and security issues we all must handle. Learn a little and spread the word and we’ll all benefit.

2nd Pricinct Advisory Council meetings are for all Eastside people who care about safety and security in the Eastside of Minneapolis. Join us if you are a resident, business owner, or other stakeholder in the 2nd Precinct. We welcome your participation and support.