February 2-PAC: Don’t be a target on the street

Please join us for this month’s Second Precinct PAC.  We meet  on the second Monday of the month, February 8, at 6 PM.  Monroe village Community Room, 1900 Central Ave NE.  There is plenty of free parking on Central Avenue and adjacent side streets.

STAY SAFE ON THE STREETS    Robberies have been on an uptick in several parts of the Second Precinct.  While some of that increase is likely due to increased reporting, part of it, especially around the U, is a real uptick.  It’s winter now and cold.  Most of us are not strolling down the streets enjoying the view but soon enough the weather will warm up and we’ll be out there.  Now is the time to think your way through the strategy you need to keep yourself from looking like an easy target.  Nick Juarez, CPS for the south sector of the Second Precinct is our presenter.

State of the Precinct:  Inspector Waite will report on new trends and current statistics.

Minutes of January meeting:  approve or amend

Treasurer’s report:

Courtwatch: Representatives from the City and County Attorney Offices will present changes in our Watch list.

Old Business:   We ran out of time in January, so didn’t recap the December 24 dinner, and we’ll do that quickly.

New Business: Plan the Program for the next year.  What do you want to hear about.  What topics are already being worked up?  Curious about something?  Let us know.

Election of officers:
Memo:  I apologize that  this agenda is very late.  I won’t send agenda out until I have confirmations and the people I needed to hear from were out of contact. — EQ

January minutes: Active shooter presentation

The meeting was called to order at 6:10 PM, 32  attenders

Inspector Waite presented the monthly Precinct report.

Statistics for 2015 show Part 1 crime (homicide, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, auto theft and arson) is down again this year, a decrease of 3.7%.  The Precinct’s Part 1 crimes have dropped each of the last three years.  The most significant decrease was in property crimes (burglary, larceny/theft, auto theft and arson).  The majority of Second Precinct crime continues to be property crimes.  We have a terrific group of sergeants assigned to Second Precinct Property Crimes who are skilled at investigating these types of crime.

Reports of  violent crime were up 16% in 2015. Inspector Waite is confident that part of the rise in violent crime can be attributed to successful programs urging people to report crimes that were previously under-reported.  This is especially true for the rise in reports of sexual assault thanks to the University  Aurora Program on campus which advocates reporting.

Aggravated assault rose in 2015 especially in the NW corner of the precinct.  These tend to be assaults by people who know their victims.

Robberies increased this year.  They fall into a pattern, rising between 11PM and 4AM, especially on Thursday-Saturday nights.  The victims have often been consuming alcohol and may additionally attract attention by focusing on phones as they are walking along a dark street.  A phone screen light is very visible from over a block away. Robbers look for the screen lights. Phones are so easily sold that they are almost a form of cash income.

 

Officers had a significant increase arrests of people who committed violent crime this year.  There was a 69% increase in arrests of the most violent of offenders.

PRESENTATION: ACTIVE SHOOTER.  Our presenter was Sgt. Donald Jach who is a Supervisor of the Community Engagement Team of the MPD.

Sgt. Jach began by running a video, “Run > Hide > Fight>>  Surviving an Active Shooter Event”  This video emphasized that if you are caught in an active shooter event, your survival may depend on having a plan you’ve already thought through.   The plan endorsed is:

1) Run if you can; encourage others to run but don’t let them slow you down  Once you are out, call 911 immediately.  Try to stop others from entering the scene.
2) Hide if you can’t get out.  Block entry to your area with furniture, whatever you find on hand,  turn off the lights, stay out of sight.  Call 911 if you can.
3) Fight.  Look around and find something you can hit with or throw to incapacitate the shooter.

Be aware that victims are usually chosen at random —  if you are not seen, the shooter likely won’t look for you.

Sgt. Jach gave some background information.  Between 2000 and 2013, there were about 160 events in total, most after 2006.  In Minnesota, we had the Rocori High School, (2 killed 0 wounded), Red Lake (9 killed, 6 wounded), Accent Signage (6 killed and 2 wounded)  About 45% of the events were at businesses and 25% at Schools.

Of 160 shooters, only 6 were female.  64% of the shooters committed suicide and another 21% were stopped.  Surrender is rare.  Shooters often begin by killing someone in their family, and then go on.  They may be angry and looking for revenge (after divorce, job loss, etc.), may be mentally ill, or may be acting on ideology.  Younger males tend to have issues like depression, and have been previously in trouble with the police.  Generally only two things stop them: suicide and police interaction.

If anything positive came out  of Columbine, it is that now all officers receive Active-Shooter training and are expected to act immediately.  The Columbine death toll was so high because back then, police were trained  to secure the building and wait for a police team with special training.  Now all officers have the training to go in.

When First Responders arrive, keep calm, stay in place, and show your hands.  At this point Officers have no idea who they are looking for, but their aim is to eliminate the threat — to identify the shooters and make them stop. Officers will not stop to help the wounded. Their job is to stop the shooter.  Then, the EMTs will come in to assist you.

Sgt. Jach’s best advice:  Be aware of your surroundings.  Be prepared to react.  Always have an exit plan. And always: If you see something, say something.

In answer to some questions:  He believes there are now more of these events for several reasons, including more news coverage which lay out steps taken by shooters; others can copy this.   He also suggests that violent video games teach violence.  What is a “mass shooting”: more than 3 or 4 shot.

You’ll find in-depth history at the FBI  website, including this PDF:
https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/office-of-partner-engagement/active-shooter-incidents/active-shooter-study-quick-reference-guide

The following is an FBI quick reference site, and includes the video brought by Sgt Jach.
https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cirg/active-shooter-and-mass-casualty-incidents/active-shooter-event-quick-reference-guide-04-29-14/view

For other questions or to schedule a presentation geared to your church, business group, or other facility, contact: donald.jach@minneapolismn.gov

COURTWATCH:

Curtis Dean Laroque has 19 arrests since 1995, 16 in the 2nd Precinct.  He has a new bench warrant, issued January 5.  He has been accused of theft, and is trespassed from the Quarry Target.

Christopher Michael Perkins has 17 arrests since 1995, 12 in the 2nd Precinct.  He has been charged with 5th degree drug possession, and just had a hearing on 1/11 (the results hadn’t been reported yet that evening).  COMMUNITY IMPACT STATEMENT REQUEST – will be sent separately.

Shawn Anthony Shelton has been dropped from the watch list

Bianka Kiersten Truman cleared her bench warrant on 1/3 and the attorneys had no further information.

Added to the list:  Albert Moen, 18 arrests since 2010. 15 in the Second Pct since 2013.  He was found with stolen wire belonging to the railroads. He will be in court on 1/20.

Meeting was adjourned at 8:20, with no time for Old Business, New Business, Election of officers.

CORRECTION: January 2PAC – Active Shooter: Make your options

Please join us for our January PAC meeting, 6 PM, January 11 in the Monroe Village Community Room, 1900 Central Avenue NE.  Our topic is:

ACTIVE SHOOTER: MAKE YOUR OPTIONS

Active shooter situations can happen anywhere, and at any time.  Because they are so unpredictable, we all need training in what to do and how to do it if an event happens in your place of business, or  while you are shopping or attending church or school, on a perfectly ordinary day.

A member of the Minneapolis Police Dept Community Engagement Team will give us a very brief overview of what to keep in mind to save your own life and the lives of others.  “Run-Hide-Fight”  looks good on paper, but only thinking your way through this will give you the edge you may need to save your own life.  Everyone can be prepared to act.  Elementary school students in Chicago, Pennsylvania, California, and other places are being trained how many ways they can keep themselves safe or fight back. It’s a long way from “Duck and Cover” or the 1950s.

There are several pamphlets and brochures available on the Dept. of Homeland Security website: http://www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness

The presenter will not be giving us a full training session at PAC.  Instead, this meeting is a chance for those who have never attended a training session to see what topics are covered.  We will have time to ask questions about the topic, and to find out how citizens, business owners, other group leaders can get more and fuller training for their business or social groups.

[Personal note: The University of MN Libraries offers this training annually, and individual departments may request another session for any reason.  University Library buildings, like classrooms, stores, schools, churches, and other public places are all vulnerable.  Creating a plan with your employees and colleagues may be vital.]

Courtwatch:  Updates from our City and County Attorneys.

Old Business:  Our First Responders’ Dinner left volunteers very tired and very satisfied.  Here’s a hint:  we had more people enjoying good food and company than ever.

New Business: Election of 2-PAC Officers

Active Shooter: Make your options

Active shooter situations can happen anywhere, and at any time.  Because they are so unpredictable, we all need training in what to do and how to do it if an event happens in your place of business, or  while you are shopping or attending church or school, on a perfectly ordinary day.

A member of the Minneapolis Police Dept Community Engagement Team will give us a very brief overview of what to keep in mind to save your own life and the lives of others.  “Run-Hide-Fight”  looks good on paper, but only thinking your way through this will give you the edge you may need to save your own life.  There are many reports that elementary school students in Chicago, Pennsylvania,  California, and other places are being trained how many ways they can fight back. It’s a long way from “Duck and Cover” or the 1950s

There are several pamphlets and brochures available on the Dept. of Homeland Security website: http://www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness

The presenter will not be giving us a full training session at PAC.  Instead, this meeting is a chance for those who have never attended a training session to see what topics are covered.  We will have time to ask questions about the topic, and to find out how citizens, business owners, other group leaders can get more and fuller training for their business or social groups.

[Personal note: The University of MN Libraries offers this training annually, and individual departments may request another session if they’ve been doing a lot of hiring.  University Library buildings, like classrooms, stores, schools, churches, and other public places are all vulnerable.  Creating a plan with your employees or colleagues may be vital.]

Old Business:  Our First Responders’ Dinner left volunteers very tired and very satisfied.  Here’s a hint:  we had more people enjoying good food and company than ever.

Courtwatch:  Updates from our City and County Attorneys.

2-PAC December 2015 Minutes

Called to order at 6:15.  22 people attending. November minutes were approved.

Our speaker was Pastor Becky Hansen from Elim  Church, 685 13th Ave NE, just north of Logan Park.

When Pastor Hansen joined the staff of Elim, she began to notice the number of homeless people who live east of the river.  She began interviewing some of them and started to develop a ministry among them.  Seven years ago, they came into the church.

Investigating the services available to the homeless on the Eastside of Minneapolis, Pastor Hansen  learned that several organizations nearby  were offering some of the services that homeless people needed, but no one had coordinated services among the agencies.  Too, transportation is an issue when people need multiple services offered by different organizations that are not close to each other.  It seemed logical to offer needed services in a single place to better coordinate services and meet needs.  In December 2006, Hope Avenue was officially opened.

From the website: “December 2006 that she gathered a group of others from Elim and Hope Avenue was officially born. Every week, we deliver lunches, toiletries, and clothing to the homeless and spend time with them in friendship and prayer. Recently, many of those we met on the streets have been coming to the church for showers and a hot breakfast on Sunday mornings.”

What is the need:  Research from the Wilder Foundation reports that consistently over time, there about 4,000 homeless people in Minneapolis, 1400 of them children in families or “unaccompanied youth” living on their own.  Wilder reports that 61% of the homeless are people of color, even though they make up only 14% of Minneapolis population.  Many of these are in the process of taking stronger charge of their lives, 41% are on the waiting list for subsidized housing and 24% are employed.  However, some 79% have major health issues: chronic health needs, mental illness, substance abuse.  Any of those is enough to make a difficult situation harder to  manage.

There is always a need for more shelter.  Hennepin County has only 763 beds in its buildings, 250 short of needs.  In January two years ago, the number of people who were totally without shelter was 214.  Hennepin County calls Elim and other places for extra beds once the temperature hits -10F.

The Eastside of Minneapolis is not an ideal place for these people because by ordinance,  no shelters could be built away from downtown religious institutions.  Nevertheless, people come here because our streets and buildings are perceived to be safe.  Some 12-15 people in NE are outside 24 hours of the day, just within 1 mile of Elim.  Another 15 live in their cars, and there are 10-12 people who spend their nights or cold weather traveling in the buses to have a warm and safe place to be.

The Heading Home, the Hennepin County Office to End Homelessness has more information at its home page http://www.hennepinca.com/

The program at Elim Church, Hope Avenue,  has grown since it was first opened.  Pastor Hanson made it clear that Hope Ave is a ministry of Elim.  It is not a social service agency, but the staff at Hope Ave know a great deal about all the services that are offered here, and can suggest which might best serve a client.  For example, Hope Ave. does not offer apartment deposit money, but they know where to send people for it.

Starting in 2013, they began offering a high protein breakfast at 7:15 along with abroad variety of services.  Copied from the website:

  • Breakfast – Breakfast is prepared and served by volunteers.
  • Shower and Laundry – Showers are available at Elim and volunteers provide clean clothes and laundry services.
  • Bible Study – Bible study and discipleship groups teach about God’s love for all people.
  • Worship – All who attend Hope Avenue are encouraged to join the congregation in worship.
  • Food Distribution – Groceries are available to anyone in need of food assistance.
  • Clothing Closet – Clothes are available to anyone in need.
  • Haircuts and Tattoo Removal –  Thanks to Lisa and Bill Anderson for making this happen!

Pastor Hanson emphasized that this is a Christian ministry, which seeks spiritual outcomes.  On Sunday morning, services are offered from 7:15 on, but the rules are that at 10:30, you either join the congregation in the sanctuary or you must leave.  People who wish to leave at 10:30 may come back for grocery distribution and other services at 11:45.

Emergency shelter:  As noted, Hennepin calls Hope Ave. when the temperatures are 10 Below, and at that point, they are open.  Last year they offered emergency shelter 3 times, once was for 4 nights running.  They sheltered 18 people.  While the rules usually prohibit admitting anyone who has been drinking, at 10 below they will let people who are drunk shelter there.  On shelter nights they work with the Second Precinct so everyone knows where people are.  Pastor Hanson found that some people refused shelter when their dogs were not admitted, so at Elim, dogs may come in also.

Another part of Pastor Hanson’s ministry is, that if she knows there is a warrant out on someone and she spots them at Elim, she offers to accompany them to the Second Precinct.  Her ministry doesn’t end there, however.  She visits them in jail or prison (if it goes that far), keeping in contact as they make their way through the court process.  Her view is that the church must work in parallel with the police and courts: ultimately they have goals in common.

Interesting observation about generation differences:  Pastor Hanson has noticed that Boomers will contribute work and money to the program, but Millenials expect this program in the church.

For more information, check with the Hope Avenue website: http://elimchurch.com/hope-avenue/

There is more information about Elim Church http://elimchurch.com

COURTWATCH:  We received updates on the cases we were watching from City Attorney Sarah Becker.  I regret to report I couldn’t hear her, and my other reporter didn’t get back to me.  If I missed something vital, it will be reported with the February minutes.

OLD BUSINESS:  Our 32nd annual dinner for first responders is approaching.  Several people volunteered their time and energy and are greatly appreciated.

ADJOURN: 7:30

December 24th at the Precinct

Dear Northeast and Southeast Community Members,

This is the 32nd year the MPD 2nd Precinct Advisory Council is having a special event on December 24 for Minneapolis Police Officers and all other Emergency Responders who serve Northeast and Southeast Minneapolis.

Last year we realized that the people who work at the Second on the 25th — especially the ones on the night shift (dog watch) got short changed, so we’re adding items for the end of that shift to even things out.

As always, the planners look for help from the community to make this event an all-Eastside thank-you to the people who keep us safer 365 days a year, including on nights when most of us will be at home with our families.

Every year we have approached neighborhoods and businesses for donations and always been grateful for the generosity of the folks who live and work east of the river.

The commercial restaurants and other commercial kitchens are very generous with donations of food, but it takes more than that to put on this event. Right now, we’re looking for donations of paper products or cash to purchase them.  We also need new and  unused restaurant take-out containers for the folks who are taking food back to their stations.  Not everyone can come in, so attenders take food back to the others.
Can you or your neighborhood organization make a contribution to this fund, or can you offer actual supplies?

Last year so many people who stepped up to help us work in short shifts on the 24th and the 25th indicated they wanted to come back this year.  I think we have enough drivers and kitchen helpers on the list right now.  If  things change, or if you’d be interested in helping another year, please contact me at my email address below, or contact Nick or Susan, your crime prevention specialists.  I’ll be very happy to add you to our list, and I’ll send you a confirmation note.

If you find you can help by making a direct donation, please contact Emilie Quast  at the email address below.

Thank you for all you do for our community. Happy Holidays to you.

Emilie Quast
2nd Precinct Advisory Council
12-24-15 Thank You Dinner Coordinator
e-quas@tc.umn.edu
612.378.0224

Your CPS is Susan Webb or Nick Juarez,

Susan.Webb@minneapolismn.gov

nicholas.juarez@minneapolismn.gov

December 14 2-PAC

Please join us on December 14 at 6 PM for a presentation on Elim, a little known private safety net for the homeless, an important service that works for us on the Eastside.

As usual, we will meet at Monroe Village, 1900 Central Ave NE.  There is plenty of free parking on Central Avenue and adjacent streets.

In addition to the many public safety services everyone knows about, the Police Dept., Fire Dept., and more, there are both private and public service organizations that provide much needed safety nets to our communities.  Come and learn so you’ll know more about people who are in the business of helping neighbors.

One of the private service providers for people who are in crisis or homeless is offered by Elim Church, located just north of Logan Park.  This is a safety net we don’t often hear about, but Pastor Becky Hanson will tell us who is likely to need the services offered by Elim and how many ways Elim offers help.  Our Chaplain Bruce Pinke also serves through Elim and he promises to be there too.

Our courtwatch list will get an upgrade from our City and County Attorneys’ offices.